Tag Archives: Vietnam

How I drowned my phone

After Phong Nha I went to the Cat Ba archipelago to see the famous Ha Long Bay (or rather the neighboring Lan Ha Bay, to be precise). The bay itself was quite spectacular, but the trip turned out very expensive.

I came up with a seemingly cool idea: rent a kayak for two days and paddle in the labyrinth of the bay until I find a beach to camp. And the first part really was pretty neat.

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Unfortunately, finding a camp spot was really hard. The vegetation was to weak to support me in my hammock and the rocks had edges too sharp for me to feel comfortable hanging from them. As I was getting more and more desperate in my search I paddled to the outskirts of the bay. And that’s when I realized I didn’t know how to get in or out of my kayak and remain dry when there are waves. So my phone got a soak. Good thing I had my main backpack wrapped in a tarp. Here’s an expensive lesson: when kayaking, assume that everything is going to fall into the water.

After some few more hours of unsuccessful search for a spot to camp, I returned to civilisation and started looking for electronic repair shops. I visited countless, to no avail (I wonder whether there are still any components left in my  phone that avoided getting stolen in those places).

But getting a replacement wasn’t my only problem. I also had to contact my family and a close friend. Mostly to save them worries, but also to avoid an expensive search and rescue operation, which my friend was supposed to initiate if I don’t contact her till one day after my expected return.

I didn’t exactly remember her email address, but knew its pattern, so I generated a few possible addresses (including some typos) and sent a message saying I was OK and to confirm to my normal email.

However, with my phone broken, I  was about to find myself locked out of my email account, since I use a password manager. As a backup, I had brought with me a Linux Live USB containing my password wallet and software to decrypt it. Unfortunately, I hadn’t expected the computers in Vietnam would be too ancient to boot from USB. Lesson learned: in addition to Live USB, bring also a Live CD. I had a phone number to my family noted down, but not to my friend (another lesson: if there is someone you need or might need to contact, always have a paper backup of their phone number).

Anyway, I created a temporary Gmail account, again generated addresses to my friend and also my family as best as I could recall. I got a confirmation from my family, yay! But my friend remained silent. After a hectic unsuccessful search for an Internet Cafe, I called my embassy emergency number and told the officer to expect a call from my friend, ignore it and inform her I was OK and would contact her soon.

The next day I got a new phone, logged into my account and saw a confirmation from my friend, dating a couple days back. Turns out I had managed to recall her address on my first try, but not on the second one, because it contained a peculiar typo.

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Caves, caves, caves

I have typed this post before, but lost it due to a bug in the WordPress app. So this time just some pictures from the Phong Nha Kebang National Park.

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Phong Nha cave:

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Tien Son cave:

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And a Buddhist monk who seemed to like me:

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And the Paradise cave (my crappy camera doesn’t do it justice):

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And a ride through the park afterwards:

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Camping in Vietnam

I finally found the spot and courage to camp on my own in the jungle. The latter was not easy after I had met a cobra on my first hike. I went to the Bach Ma National Park.

I was disappointed by the main path which turned out to be a paved road.

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The only advantage: I could enjoy unobscured view for the entire hike.

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And when the paved road ended 19 kilometers later and 1400 meters higher, I found a hidden treasure along the trail leading to the peak: war tunnels, unaltered and to this day not marketed. It was really cool/creepy to explore them as they were left by the soldiers, while dozens of freaked out bats were flying right next to my face in panic.

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Definitely a highlight of the trip. And not far there was a cool pagoda almost at the peak.

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Next came the five lakes trail, along which I started to look for a camp spot since I wanted plenty of time to experiment with the setup.

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The spot on that shelf would have been perfect if it wasn’t for the widow-maker leaning from the left bank. The search would have been much faster if I wasn’t avoiding blocking the trail. This was probably unnecessary since some parts of it were covered in thick spider webs and I hadn’t seen any other tourists earlier that day.

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Eventually I found a spot to hang my hammock.

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The view from my spot looking upstream…

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and looking downstream:

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I’m happy to say that my new experimental method for keeping distance between mosquito net and the hammock worked great: not a single mosquito bite.

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I hadn’t brought with me any insulation for the hammock, so I got uncomfortably cold as expected, but still managed to get a few hours of sleep. Actually, I’m quite surprised how easy it was too fall asleep despite this new environment and all the jungle noises.

On my way back I continued along the five lakes trail and took a little detour to visit the 300 m high Rhododendron Waterfall.

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And BTW here’s a picture of my ride from Hue to Dong Hoi, titled How to squeeze 22 people into (what would in other countries be) a 10-person minibus:

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Overcoming my driving impairment

I haven’t sat on a bicycle since I was 12 years old. I got my driver’s license 6 years ago and didn’t drive any vehicle since then. But since in Vietnam you either drive or are stuck with group tours, it was high time I change that.

First, few days ago in Da Lat I ranted a motorbike and spent few hours driving around

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Then, yesterday in Hoi An I rented a bicycle and re-learned how to ride it by going to the Marble Mountains. I’m so glad I did!

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And on my way back it wasn’t hard to find a strip of beach with no people.

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There were some small fish jumping over the surface of water and when I sat down, the crabs around me soon resumed their funny dance. It couldn’t have been any better.

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Outdoors in Vietnam

In Da Lat I went for a short yet demanding hike. On my way through the rainforest I met a local that I didn’t want to befriend:

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(however, I was more than happy to join some human locals at their bonfire when I was exploring off the trail)

Few days later I ended up in Nha Trang where I got a chance to snorkel for the first time in my life. The coral reef was mind-blowing. Oh, and there were also some amazing temples.

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Pagodas in Can Tho

Just some pictures

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One thing I had not expected:

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A gym!

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And finally monks chanting in front of a flashing neon:

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Vietnamese buses, unexpected luxury

Before I boarded the first bus, I was expecting terrible conditions. Something like Indian trains you see on TV, with people sharing their seats with livestock. I can’t have been farther from truth.

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The buses are new, clean, well equipped and offer plenty of legroom. The bus stations and rest stations hold the same high standard. It’s way better than any bus I’ve been on, not to speak of the Polish buses I got used to. And on long rides you can take a sleeper bus:

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The only downside: about half of Vietnam population seems to be bus sick :-)

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